Apples That Float Away

by Ben Pickard   Sep 2, 2016


To breathe in woe and then bemoan the thunder clouds,
Can bring no kind of sympathy or peaceful rest.
The storms that we amass we then must blow away
And tie our hearts upon the setting sun out west.

Are apples truly rotten on this gnarly tree -
Can birds not perch upon the branches just as well?
Is all this ugliness, in fact, just ripe in me,
And have I cursed this life with my own wretched spell?

A perfect home is something that I always knew,
But greener grass is all I ever really craved;
A lesson, then, before I finally undo
The ropes that tie my fragile raft and float away.

--

2/9/16

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Latest Comments

  • 1 week ago

    by Kitty Cat Lady

    Ben this is amazing and I'm commenting without reading the other comments so as not to influence my interpretation ... I'm sure there could be thousands!

    "To breathe in woe and then bemoan the thunder clouds,
    Can bring no kind of sympathy or peaceful rest.
    The storms that we amass we then must blow away
    And tie our hearts upon the setting sun out west."

    This feels like regret ... a man (I'm assuming) dissatisfied with life in some way (mid-life crisis maybe?) who has first looked for the reason of his discontent in his wife. By prodding that perfectly fine relationship, he's opened a can of worms and broken it. He knows it was a stupid thing to do and now can't expect any sympathy nor rest. He now has to deal with the fallout of that and take his sad heart elsewhere.

    "Are apples truly rotten on this gnarly tree -
    Can birds not perch upon the branches just as well?
    Is all this ugliness, in fact, just ripe in me,
    And have I cursed this life with my own wretched spell?"

    The apples represent her - perhaps he feels she's lost her sparkle (rotten), the tree their relationship ... his realisation that all was fine with them and her, it was him who was having an issue (ugliness) and by breaking the relationship, he's mucked up his life with his own dissatisfaction/boredom.

    "A perfect home is something that I always knew,
    But greener grass is all I ever really craved;
    A lesson, then, before I finally undo
    The ropes that tie my fragile raft and float away."

    The conclusion of this painful lesson ... the classic cliche "you don't know what you've got till it's gone" ... he had a perfectly fine wife and life but his thirst for this shiny new lady are his undoing. In fact, the last two lines could even be his last thoughts as he finally succumbs to the charms of a seductress ... "before I finally undo the ropes that tie my fragile raft and float away" he knows this act will ultimately end his marriage.

    I may be way off base, but I've had fun unpicking it :-) To write a poem that can mean something different to each reader is a gift. Love it! x
    =^.^=

    • 1 week ago

      by Ben Pickard

      Kitty - now that's a praise-worthy comment! Thank you.

  • 1 week ago

    by Jamie

    Ben,

    The reason i feel this is good is because there are many ways this can be interpreted. The mark of a good poem to me is, besides the writing and imagery is leaving the reader to think. You have done well here.

    Honestly it took me a minute or two for it to click but i think this poem is in the point of view of someone who is either looking to start over or someone who has just started suffering from depression because of their present, probably both in my opinion.

    I believe the first stanza is about someone who has suffered from depression possibly manic depression and is looking for something more. A big change per chance?

    The second stanza tells me that the person blames themselves for the misery they are suffer even though it is not true at all.

    The last stanza is about breaking free. Even though they had an ok past, they want more. They want to prove yo themselves that they can be happy on their own.

    The more i read this the more i love the point of view, because it seems you are giving us someones thoughts, that they are too afraid to speak in voice. Each stanza completes the last. That is what mskes this poem excellent.

  • 1 week ago

    by Beautiful Tragedy

    Wow Ben. This is a very powerful piece and I think a lot of us have been here in one way or another.
    Well done,
    BT

  • 3 weeks ago

    by - Mr. Darcy

    Sometimes we fail to appreciate what lies at our feet. We did of course, once praise that hallowed ground, we recognised it's worth. Was it not by driving the stake deep into the soil that the ground was claimed?
    Look around with those same eyes, the grass here is just as green, if not greener!

  • 1 month ago

    by Dagmar Wilson

    Congrats Ben well deserved

    • 1 month ago

      by Ben Pickard

      Lovely to hear from you, Dagmar. All the best.

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